Amenity in Urban Revival
6 Projects 
Urban Dwell 
Proxemics-Territoriality-Privacy
8 Projects 

200p / pur & jacket / USD 29.4
ISSN_2092-5190



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from other Countries


Anacostia Crossing, 11th St. Bridge Park _ OMA + OLIN
Clichy – Montfermeil Metro Station
_ Miralles Tagliabue EMBT + Bordas + Peiro
Vinge Train Station _ Henning Larsen Architects
The House of Hungarian Music _ Sou Fujimoto Architects
Photo Museum of Budapest and Museum of Hungarian Architecture
_ Középülettervezo” Zrt
Museum of Ethnography _ Vallet de Martinis Architectes
+ Diid Architectes

Amenity in Urban Revival
Natural Urban Amenity _ Aldo Vanini
Streetdome _ CEBRA + Glifberg + Lykke
Bushwick Inlet Park _ Kiss + Cathcart
LeFrak Center at Lakeside _ Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects
Circus Arts Conservatory _ Doazan + Hirschberger & Associés
Allez-Up Climbing Center _ Smith Vigeant Architects
Indoor Rock Climbing Center _ Lanz + Mutschlechner
+ Wolfgang Meraner


Dwell How
Proxemics-Territoriality-Privacy
Urban Dwell: Proxemics-Territoriality-Privacy _ Fabrizio Aimar
Black Red House _ ISON Architects
SG House _ Tuttiarchitetti
Sharifi-ha House _ Nextoffice
House CM _ Bruno Vanbesien + Christophe Meersman
Namly House _ Chang Architects
The Wall of Nishihara _ Sabaoarch
House in Tsudanuma _ Fuse-Atelier
House 1014 _ Harquitectes

Amenity in Urban Revival


Urban Amenity
The gradual freeing of human time from the totalitarian demands of survival has expanded the possibility, if not the necessity, of humanity’s dedication to non-utilitarian activities. Only with the advent of modernity has society rediscovered the values of sport, both competitive and recreational, embraced by the Greek and Roman civilizations, which seemed to disappear from popular diffusion in later centuries dominated by Christian ethics.
Our society invests substantial economic resources and media attention to the practice of competitive
sport, and has developed for this purpose specific, well-defined architectural typologies. Less creativity and resources have been allocated to places of leisure and non-competitive physical activity, with such efforts often limited to the definition of spaces directly connected to educational complexes.
If competitive sport has now finally slipped into the field of show business, laying a superstructural role in everyone’s lives, we cannot forget that the word sport originates from the Latin deportare, in the sense of “get out” and thence from the old French word desport, meaning recreation, fun.
Yet one of the limitations of contemporary architectural culture consists in its difficulty imagining new functions to be facilitated using the means of the discipline, while it instead wearily performs a repertoire that varies little and that always favors transient, self-referential fashion.
In fact, leisure’s wide variety of activities and non-conventional character make it an interesting field of compositional and functional research, particularly as regards the redevelopment of urban spaces that have lost their original purpose or that have been incorporated into urban growth without a specific function. Sites and facilities related to leisure and non-competitive physical exercise represent a ground for experimentation in new forms as well as in finding new ways to connect conventional parts of the city or to re-enter areas that have lost their original function.. written by Aldo Vanini
Proxemics-Territoriality-Privacy


The gradual freeing of human time from the totalitarian demands of survival has expanded the possibility, if not the necessity, of humanity’s dedication to non-utilitarian activities. Only with the advent of modernity has society rediscovered the values of sport, both competitive and recreational, embraced by the Greek and Roman civilizations, which seemed to disappear from popular diffusion in later centuries dominated by Christian ethics.
Our society invests substantial economic resources and media attention to the practice of competitive
sport, and has developed for this purpose specific, well-defined architectural typologies. Less creativity and resources have been allocated to places of leisure and non-competitive physical activity, with such efforts often limited to the definition of spaces directly connected to educational complexes.
If competitive sport has now finally slipped into the field of show business, laying a superstructural role in everyone’s lives, we cannot forget that the word sport originates from the Latin deportare, in the sense of “get out” and thence from the old French word desport, meaning recreation, fun.
Yet one of the limitations of contemporary architectural culture consists in its difficulty imagining new functions to be facilitated using the means of the discipline, while it instead wearily performs a repertoire that varies little and that always favors transient, self-referential fashion.
In fact, leisure’s wide variety of activities and non-conventional character make it an interesting field of compositional and functional research, particularly as regards the redevelopment of urban spaces that have lost their original purpose or that have been incorporated into urban growth without a specific function. Sites and facilities related to leisure and non-competitive physical exercise represent a ground for experimentation in new forms as well as in finding new ways to connect conventional parts of the city or to re-enter areas that have lost their original function. written by Fabrizio Aimar